5 Essentials: Joris Voorn

Joris Voorn is undoubtedly one of house and techno’s (not to mention, The Netherlands’) finest musical ambassadors. With two decades in the game, the prolific DJ, Producer, and curator has indelibly left his mark on the world of dance music.

See also: Interview: Joris Voorn

With that, the man himself celebrates his 39th birthday today and we thought it would be a welcome gift to all his fans out there to highlight five of his most important tracks. With so many releases to his name, this was no easy feat so surely we may have forgotten something.

Dosem – Beach Kisses (Joris Voorn Green Mix) | Green (2009)

Powerful synth’s are the order of the day on this euphoric masterpiece.

The Secret | Cocoon (2010)

A fist-pump-inducing hook that Voorn modulates ever so slightly to keep things fresh makes this a disco-tinged tech house roller.

Sweep The Floor | Rejected (2009)

Perhaps Joris’ best offering for that “one song that everyone is waiting for at that special moment of the night” category.

Mark Fanciulli – The Tide (Joris Voorn Edit) | Rejected (2011)

With Joris on the edit here, listeners are treated to a stripped, sleazy and bass-heavy groove, maintaining the hypnotic vocal as the key to instantly whisk you away to your very own euphoria.

Harry Choo Choo Romero – The Phuture (Joris Voorn Remix) | Ovum (2010)

Joris’ remix is a complete roller, taking a dubbed out approach with it, but still keeping the main build vocal of the original.

Bonus

DJ Dozia – Pop Culture (Joris Voorn Remix) | Ovum (2015)

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Joris himself has described working on the track as, “It was a defining moment finding Dj Dozias Pop Culture in my local record store in 1998. The simplicity of the record was evident, but the few elements in combination with the classic Peech Boys acapella sounded like more than the sum of its parts. It was the blueprint of forward thinking house music, a sound that would inspire me to make tracks like Sweep The Floor 10 years later. I remember asking Josh in 2007 if I could remix Pop Culture, but the remix offer came in much later. It turned out be an almost impossible task remixing a track so simple and powerful, it simply couldnt be improved. So I tried stepping away from the original sound and create something that is more like a nod to the original.”