MK is an artist, producer, DJ, songwriter and an internationally respected name in the worlds of R&B and pop as well as Dance.

As a teenager growing up in Detroit, MK was lucky enough to be befriended by one of the true Techno originators, Kevin Saunderson. Kevin became a mentor and big brother, giving Marc the keys to his already infamous, Detroit KMS Studios. During those early years, MK chose to follow the path of Producer/Artist over that of a DJ. Staying behind the scenes in the studio enabled him to hone his craft. One after the other, his productions and remixes were going top ten, top five and Number One over and over.

Fast-forward to the present after a self-imposed break, MK has returned with some fantastic mixes and productions. Once again, he has proven himself to be consistent and yet surprising, with a whole new series of songs that showcase his uncanny ability to reinvent and rework an existing track.

Now, MK travels the world, has been inducted into Pete Tong’s Hall of Fame, and is cited as an influence by the likes of Maceo Plex, Dubfire, Danny Daze, Laidback Luke, Afrojack, Todd Terry, Duke Dumont, Lee Foss and others. Over the Bank Holiday of May 28+29, MK will bring his “Area 10” concept to London’s We Are FSTVL, where he curates a stage featuring Hannah Wants, Catz N Dogz, Oliver Dollar, CamelPhat and more. Anticipating the event, I caught up with MK to discuss the festival, summer plans, New York, Detroit and more.

“I use the experiences that I have had before to influence what I do”

Over the years, who would you say have been some seminal influences on your life and music? I’ve read that you nice words for the likes of Will Smith and Quincy Jones, but have you been particularly inspired by any other artists?
Growing up, I TOTALLY LOVED DEPECHE MODE, THE CURE, MINISTRY, JOY DIVISION/NEW ORDER, and I was really into industrial sort of bands and then I met this producer, Chez Damier and he introduced me to all the Detroit people. Once you meet one of those guys, you end up meeting them all and trust me, there are a bunch of characters there. I love them all.

I’m wondering how your connection is with Detroit these days? How do you see Detroit’s scene these days, outside of Movement. Have you noticed an influx of artistic types coming to the city?
Detroit is still home for me, my mom and sis and brother are there so the connections are pretty deep on a family level, friend level and on a music level.

The city seems to be more vibrant today than it has been in the last 30 years. Originally, I think people started coming back because there was so much affordable space available. Artists, are always on the hunt for affordable work space, but the revival and rebirth of Detroit is everywhere. It reminds me of what went Brooklyn went through about 10 or 12 years ago. Still redeveloping but there is a feeling of community with the people living there, they feel like they are part of something special.

On the same token, what about New York City? How have you seen seeing New York’s current nightlife scene as compared to when you first moved there in the 90s.
The New York club scene has really reinvented itself in the last six or seven years or so and it is very cool to play and hang there too, New York is definitely back.

It’s widely known that you took quite a hiatus from dance music, to the tune of a decade or so. Again, I’ve read you state that you essentially got bored with the scene at some point. How does the scene now compare to back then in this regard?
The scene is definitely different now but, to be honest, it’s still all really new to me since back then I spent most of my time in the studio and wasn’t much of a club guy, I spent most of my time behind the mixing boards..

What makes it exciting now?
I would have to say the fact that I am DJing has made all the difference to the way I feel about being out. I make a track in the studio and can see right away how people respond to it. It is really gratifying.