With clubbing seemingly existent within a volatile state of limbo in many of the world’s biggest cities, the UK has undoudtedly seen some of the worst casualties, with several prominent nightspots shutting in the last few months, notably in London.

After the closing of renowned clubs like Plastic People and Crucifix Lane, as well as the near miss that was Fabric‘s closure threat, Night Time Industries Association (NTIA) aims to prove that the late-night industry has plenty of positives, especially within the realms of, “employment, business rates, regeneration of areas and tourism to the UK“.  Given that the industry generates 6% of the UK’s total revenue stream, as well as employing almost 8% of the nation’s workforce, it is rather strange that an association of this description has only just been formed to provide protection for an industry that, like many others, has been hit by the dismal realities of Austerity Britain.

See also: London Clubbing Institution Fabric Faces Closure Threats

Members of the NTIA board include Dance Tunnel’s Dan Beaumont and Alex Proud of Proud Group, and say the organization will lobby politicians nationally and locally, commission and publish research that highlights the various benefits of the night time industry and campaign to change planning laws so existing music venues aren’t harmed by new residential developments.

Chairman Alan D Miller, cofounder of East London’s Old Truman Brewery, has gone on record as saying: “We want to provide a voice for those in the Night Time Industries who range from the single venue operator to those with numerous venues. We need our fellow owners and operators to sign up with us so that we can be an even stronger voice in the UK. This is the first step of creating something that can be enormously influential.

Alan Miller’s launch of the Vibe bar 20 years ago helped turn Brick Lane, pictured, into a creative and cultural centre in east London. Photograph: Graham Turner

Alan Miller’s launch of the Vibe bar 20 years ago helped turn Brick Lane, pictured, into a creative and cultural centre in east London. Photograph: Graham Turner

Furthermore, Sir Harvey Goldsmith, who also sits on the NTIA’s advisory board, says: “The night time industry is the lifeblood of music and entertainment in the UK. The night time economy is also very important to the economy of cities and towns. It is where the next generation of talent develops. We need to encourage our entrepreneurs and make sure we do not stifle creativity by imposing overly restrictive measures on one of Britain’s most productive sectors.

The Hydra, Egg London and Fabric are among those with founding members, and NTIA is after more venue owners and operators.

As the NTIA is calling on venue owners and operators to join the association, you can find all relevant sign up information – HERE

Source: NTIA.co.uk